@keith_in_tnt on Twitter.com

Loading...

Wednesday, February 28, 2007

T&T Carnival 2K7 Photos by Keith in Trinidad... Finally...

v-- Click here to go to the photo gallery --v
Link to T&T Carnival 2K7 Photo Gallery
As I've done for the last few years, I was on the road with my camera on the big Carnival days. Unfortunately, it rained quite a bit on Tuesday. And so between water and very low light, several hours on Tuesday afternoon were lost.

Some absolutely fantastic photos were still captured though. Trinbagonians are, after all, the world's best models-on-the-spot when in costume - and out of costume too for that matter.

After some careful culling, cropping, tweaking, resizing and stamping, 208 snaps are now ready for display.

Click on the image above to visit the photo gallery, or browse to http://www.kodakgallery.com/I.jsp?c=18w19uav.2gh73pqv&x=1&y=yfcqwc



ADDENDUM: On my choice of Kodak's EasyShare Gallery to host the pictures...

Some of you have written to find out whether and why you need to register to see the photos.

Yes, you do need to create an account with the Kodak EasyShare Gallery site. It's quick and easy, and best of all, free. If you don't have one already, all Kodak asks in order to create an account is your first name, a password and an email address.

When you sign in with your username and password, you ensure the privacy of your and my online albums. Your visit is recorded in my account's Guestbook and the photos will be saved in your account under "My Friends' Albums." That way, you can view my photos anytime, share them with others, order film-quality prints, and make comments.

Most importantly though, having Kodak Gallery account holders only see the albums adds a layer of access control for the protection of my photo's subjects.

Finally, neither I nor Kodak will share your information with anyone, and we will not spam you. So feel free to sign up and join the fun.


My personal thanks to the Police...

I had just closed and locked my door behind me yesterday afternoon after dallying in the driveway to play with the cat. As I made my way up the stairs, through my back windows I saw a man running out of the bushes and fleeing my backyard. Though I could not see his full passage, he would have been headed down the side of the house not traversed by us, probably to jump the wall at the front. We keep both sets of gates locked at all times. He would have heard me coming through and locking the gate, and would have heard too when I entered the house.

The Police were here less than 10 minutes after I called 999 to tell them that I had seen a prowler in my yard and that I suspected that he had already left. When they arrived, the officer who alighted the vehicle came into the yard and looked around. He took note of my story and the guy's description as best as I could give, and then left, telling the driver as he got back into the vehicle, "we lookin' for a dark fella of African descent, about medium height, in a red cap and a white jersey."

I don't know whether or not they will catch the guy that I saw in my yard nor what they could possibly charge him with. I pray though that the speed with which the Police arrived will serve as a deterrent and a foil against any intentions that he may have had.

I never got the officers' regimental numbers, nor did I take note of the name of the person who answered 999. But I want to thank them here and publicly for being available to so quickly answer a citizen's call.

Monday, February 26, 2007

"Thank a Policeman" Week - Feb. 26th to Mar. 4th, 2007

No, it is not a formal or Government-sanctioned week on the local calendar...

Following recent newspaper reports proclaiming the best Carnival ever for the security forces, of festivities in Chaguanas being under control, of rapid responses to persons in trouble on the road even after dark, and even if the officers weren't able to quell incidents immediately, and handling Carnival in Port of Spain despite forces depleted by food poisoning, the Police Service and accompanying military officers do deserve our collective gratitude. Under normal circumstances, the officers receive nothing but salary, the occasional wine to which they are forbidden to respond, and grumbling from the Trinidad and Tobago public that the Police aren't good for anything.

Still, our officers turn up for work everyday and perform the decidedly thankless task of watching over us all.

This week though, let's all do something different.

Rather than moaning and complaining about the collective, let us single out anonymous individual officers for some positive attention.

Instead of grumbling about the traffic situation, let's thank that officer standing in the hot sun directing traffic because those lights aren't working this morning.

Instead of groaning about the crime situation while sitting in the line of traffic, let's thank the officers manning the roadblock for ensuring that the drunk driver that may have killed you is pulled to the side of the road and that the bandit that was about to "put down a wuk" was also caught before he got where he was going.

Instead of muttering under your breath about the few bad eggs in the Service, walk right up to an officer and say with sincerity, "I hope that my gratitude isn't misplaced, but I want to thank you personally for doing this job. I know that it must be really hard being on your feet all day like this in the hot sun. But thanks very much for doing what you do to make sure that the streets are safe for me and my loved ones."

Everyone knows that it's little gestures like these that make it worthwhile getting out of bed in the morning. The officers on the force, particularly those trying to perform effectively, can certainly use some public goodwill. So let's take the week ahead to thank our Police Officers (and soldiers!) for doing what they do everyday.

As a firm believer in the power of positive reinforcement, this is sure to make the difficult task of policing that much easier for the officers that we personally and sincerely thank, and it will help them to tackle their jobs with greater enthusiasm...

It will certainly make much more of a difference than wearing black or red.


Thursday, February 22, 2007

Trinidad & Tobago Carnival 2K7 Competition Results

With Trinidad & Tobago Carnival 2007 now over, we're now at the point where most parents will be scrabbling through old newspapers and culling the Internet to corral competition results for their children's Social Studies projects. Thankfully, comrades in the media fraternity have been able to provide most of the competition details - even contested ones - at the drop of a hat.

Competition results (as many as can be found) are as follows.

T&T CARNIVAL 2007 RESULTS
ROAD MARCH
  1. Jumbie - Machel Montano (388)
  2. Open D'Gate - Sherwayne Winchester (34)
  3. Sugar Boy - Patrice Roberts (33)
BAND OF THE YEAR

Large Bands - 2007 Parade of the Bands - George Bailey

Place

Presentation

Band

Band Leader

Points

1st

India - The Story of Boyie

MacFarlane Carnival 2007

Brian MacFarlane

1304

2nd

La Eevolution Francaise

Trini Revellers

David Carmeron

1258

3rd

Hiawatha

Legacy

Mike Antoine/Juliet DeLabastide

1240


Medium Bands - 2007 Parade of the Bands - George Bailey

Place

Presentation

Band

Band Leader

Points

1st

Golden Heritage - A Tribute to Mas

Masquerade

Earl Patterson

1206

2nd

In the Name of Troy

Genesis

Ian McKenzie

1126

3rd

Jungle

ImageNation

Patrick Roberts

1119

4th

On the Cattwalk

Trevor Wallace and Associates

Trevor Wallace

1107


Small Bands - 2007 Parade of the Bands - George Bailey

Place

Presentation

Band

Band Leader

Points

1st

Nocturn

De B.O.S.S

Churchill George

1225

2nd

Amazonia

De Midas T&T

Stephen Dereck

1201

3rd

Kachina Warriors

tribal Connection

Astil Alleyne

1154


Mini Bands - 2007 Parade of the Bands - George Bailey

Place

Presentation

Band

Band Leader

Points

1st

People of the Dancing Sky - Iroqouis Way

Jackman & Associates


1236

2nd

Faces of the Nation

Rosalind Gabriel and Friends

Rosalind Gabriel

1203

3rd

Devils Come to Take Over

2001 Jab Malassie

Ashton Fournillier

1144


Large Bands - 2007 Parade of the Bands - Harold Saldenah

Place

Presentation

Band

Band Leader

Points

1st

La Revolution Francaise

Trini Revellers

David Cameron

423

2nd

Hiawatha

Legacy

Mike Antoine/ Juliet Delabastide

406

3rd

Cocktails - You Shake We Stir

Pulse 8 Ltd.

Meg Cheekes

366

4th

Uthopia

Harts Ltd.

Gerald M Hart

305


Medium Bands - 2007 Parade of the Bands - Harold Saldenah

Place

Presentation

Band

Band Leader

Points

1st

Golden Heritage - A Tribute To The Mas

Masquerade

Earl Patterson

403

2nd

D Mask Ball

Rampage

Mervyn Castle

391

3rd

On The Catwalk - Bob Mackie

Trevor Wallace & Associates

Trevor Wallace

377

4th

Jungle

Image Nation

Patrick Roberts

375


Small Bands - 2007 Parade of the Bands - Harold Saldenah

Place

Presentation

Band

Band Leader

Points

1st

"Nocturn"

De B.O.S.S.

Churchill George

370

2nd0

Amazonia

D Midas T&T

Stephen Derek

368

3rd

Kachina Dancers

Tribal Connection

Astil Alleyne

363

4th

Sites & Culture of Trinidad and Tobago

Mt. Hope Connection

Keith Carrington

358


Mini Bands - 2007 Parade of the Bands - Harold Saldenah

Place

Presentation

Band

Band Leader

Points

1st

People of the Dancing Sky - The Iroquoia Way

Jackman & Associates

Anthony Jackman

400

2nd

Faces of the Nation

Rosalind Gabriel & Friends

Rosalind Gabriel

381

3rd

Jab Malassie - From the Zone Hell Raisers

T&T Jab Malassie

Elizabeth Fournillier

304

4th

ICC World Cup Brown Paperbag

Rhapsody in Blue

Joel Mark Felicien

300


Large Bands - 2007 Parade of the Bands - Lil Hart

Place

Presentation

Band

Band Leader

Points

1st

India - The Story of Boyie

MacFarlane Carnival 07

Brian McFarlane

466

2nd

Sahara - Out of the Vast Emptiness Comes

Island People Mas

Dane Lewis

417

3rd

La Revolution Francaise

Trini Revellers

David Cameron

414

4th

Hiawatha

Legacy

Mike Antoine/ Juliet Delabastide

398


Medium Bands - 2007 Parade of the Bands - Lil Hart

Place

Presentation

Band

Band Leader

Points

1st

Golden Heritage - A Tribute to Mas

Masquerade

Earl Patterson

385

2nd

On the Catwalk - Bob Mackie

Trevor Wallace & Associates

Trevor Wallace

370

3rd

Jungle

Image Nation

Patrick Roberts

365

4th

In The Name of Troy

Genesis

Ian McKenzie

362


Small Bands - 2007 Parade of the Bands - Lil Hart

Place

Presentation

Band

Band Leader

Points

1st

"Nocturn"

De B.O.S.S

Churchill George

395

2nd

Amazonia

D Midas T&T

Stephen Derek

391

3rd

Kachina Dancers

Tribal Connection

Astil Alleyne

385

4th

Site & Culture of Trinidad And Tobago

Mt. Hope Connection

Keith Carrington

329


Mini Bands - 2007 Parade of the Bands - Lil Hart

Place

Presentation

Band

Band Leader

Points

1st

People of the Dancing Sky - Iroquois Way

Jackman & Associates

Anthony Jackman

366

2nd

Faces of the Nation

Rosalind Gabriel & Friends

Rosalind Gabriel

319

3rd

Cry of the Comanche

Rudolph Ryan & Associates

Rudolph Ryan

311

4th

Shipless - Ready to Sail

Family Reunion

Maria Humprey

301



DIMANCHE GRAS

Calypso Monarch
  1. Cro Cro - 'Nobody Eh Go Know' (428)
  2. De Fosto - 'Police Money' (423)
  3. Devon Seales - 'One Song' (420)
  4. Maria Bhola - 'I Love You' (418)
  5. Chalkdust - 'Soca Warriors'
  6. Duane O'Conner - 'Satorial Elegance' (412)
  7. Sean Daniel - 'No Ring, No Ting' (410)
  8. Skatie - 'Eat Yuh Cake and Have It' (402)
  9. Heather McIntosh - 'Check I' (394)
  10. Shadow - 'Ah Coulda' (392)
  11. Singing Sandra - 'Sundan' (385)
  12. Mr Caesar - Carry Me' (382)
  13. (TIE) Crazy - 'Paradise' / Brother Valentino 'Pioneers' (379)
  14. Black Sage - 'Send for Somebody' (367)
King of the Bands
  1. Curtis Eustace - "D'Wrath of Tutankumhan" (424)
  2. Geraldo Veira Sr. - "Vision of the Snow Warriors" (422)
  3. Lionel Jagessar Jr. - "Wa Chink Sapa, Native Healer" (400)
  4. Earl Thompson - Scorpion King (394)
  5. Jason Mohammed - "The Spirit of the Shaman" (393)
  6. Wade Madray - "Native Warrior" (388)
  7. Roland St. George - "Les Bijoux" (384)
  8. Dave Larkhan - "Lord of the Jungle" (383)
  9. Ronald Mayers - "Predators of the Night" (363)
  10. Kenwyn Millington - "The Mask of Pierrot, that Mocking Pretender" (349)
Queen of the Bands
  1. Peola Marchan - "The Incadescence of Beatrice Love Has Bought" (409)
  2. Susan Low - "Eve - The Garden of Eden" (400)
  3. Lenore Caterson - "Shakti, Goddess of D'Forest" (398)
  4. (TIE) Gloria Dallsingh - "D'Lady of Glamour and Glitter" / Anra Bobb - "Ohina, Lady of D'Morning" (388)
  5. Leslie-Ann Boisselle - "Fusion, The Spirit of Togetherness" (377)
  6. Pamela Gordon - "D'Ritual" (374)
  7. Annemarie Quammie - "A Manzanilla Sling at the La Boucan" (372)
  8. Inez Gould - "Light Up The Ball (368)
  9. Rosemarie Kuru Jagessar - "Soyala, Winter Queen" (350)
NATIONAL PANORAMA FINALS

Large Conventional Bands
  1. Neal & Massy All-Stars (288.5)
  2. Phase II Pan Groove (286.5)
  3. Sagicor Exodus (275)
  4. WITCO Desperadoes (274.5)
  5. Tropical Angel Harps (269.5)
  6. BP Renegades (269)
  7. (TIE) PCS Starlift / Caribbean Airlines Invaders (260.5)
Medium Conventional Bands
  1. Courts Sound Specialists of Laventille (279)
  2. Excellent Stores Silver Stars (278)
  3. CLICO Sforzata (277)
  4. Carib Dixieland (276)
  5. Katzenjammers (275)
  6. Lee Chongs Pan Glow (269)
  7. Harmonites (266)
  8. Arima Angel Harps (263)
INTERNATIONAL SOCA MONARCH

Power Soca Monarch
  1. Iwer George - Fete after Fete (275)
  2. Nadia Batson - My Land (269)
  3. Shurwayne Winchester - Open D' Gate (258)
  4. Patrice Roberts - Light It Up (252)
  • bmobile Peoples Choice: Shurwayne Winchester
Groovy Soca Monarch
  1. Biggie Irie - Nah Goin' Home
  2. Chucky - Turn Around
  3. Nadia Batson - Caribbean Girl
  4. Shurwayne Winchester - Alequa
  • bmobile Peoples Choice: Shurwayne Winchester
TUCO Calypso Competition Results

TUCO Extempo Competition
  1. Joseph Laplaceliere (Lingo)
  2. Phillip Murray (Black Sage)
TUCO Humourous Calypso
  1. Winston Bailey (Mighty Shadow)
  2. Wendell Aikin
  3. Anthony Hendrickson (All Rounder)
  4. Victor McDonald (Mr MacK)
  5. Kenson Neptune (Ninja)
TUCO Social Commentary
  1. Maria Bhola
  2. Anthony Hendrickson (All Rounder)
  3. Hollis Liverpool (Chalkdust)
  4. Carlos James (Skatie)
  5. Patrick Lewis (Revealer)
TUCO Chutney Soca
  1. Heralal Rampertap
  2. Tricia Hamilton (Sexy Tricia)
  3. Lynette Steam (Lady Gypsy)
  4. Marva McKenzie
  5. Morel Peters (Luta)
Junior Soca Monarch
  1. Marcel Bennet (Holy Cross College)
  2. Erphan Avles (St. George College)
  3. Gerelle Forbes (St. Francios Girls College)
Junior Calypso Monarch
  1. Tenisha Weekes (Melville Memorial Girls)
  2. Dariem Charles (Sangre Grande Educational Institute)
  3. Ezekiel Yorke (St. Mary’s College)
  4. Erphaan Alves (St. George’s College)
  5. Allan Celland Goddard (St. Xavier’s Private School)
  6. Alisha Williams (San Juan Senior Comprehensive)
  7. Tenaj Smith (St. Augustine Senior Secondary)
  8. Dinnessa Nelson (ASJA Girls College)
  9. Dineka Nelson (San Fernando Government Secondary)
  10. Zobah Samuel (Signal Hill Secondary)
  11. Natessa Alexander (Ste Madeleine Secondary)
  12. Akiel La Borde (Presentation College)
  13. Jalana Bryan (Bishop Anstey High School)
Sources:

Monday, February 19, 2007

TRINIDAD EXPRESS: Salvation of T&T depends on us

On the odd occasion, something non-inflammatory or not penned by Minister Of Works Colm Imbert gets into the Letter to the Editor section at the Express.

Kelvin C. James, Sr. emailed the Express and his piece appears in the Monday 19th February, 2007 issue under caption Salvation of T&T depends on us. He writes, wrapping up his piece,
Only WE can save ourselves from ourselves. No government can do it alone. So, let us of us do our little part to help make a better society in T&T. A society that is free of racial and ethnic tensions and without the constant fear of us being victimised by crime. It is time we take our collective heads out of the sand and see things as they really are.
All in all, it's a good and positive read, and something that should be reprinted on any day other than Carnival Monday.

Source: http://www.trinidadexpress.com/index.pl/article_opinion?id=161106096

Alcoa in Trinidad and Tobago

I've been neither here nor there on aluminium smelters in Trinidad and Tobago. Rather, I should say that I have not been able to form an opinion either way.

The Government seems dead set on establishing aluminium smelters here, citing economic benefit and industrial development as cause.

The anti-smelter movement, comprised of various political, quasi-political, academic, residential and other miscellaneous bodies is dead set against it, citing everything from creeping dictatorship to environmental destruction.

I've heard tell of successful smelters established in various parts of the world, and I've heard tales of doom and gloom about smelters.

I've even heard the Prime Minister say recently that drug runners who use the nation's quiet fishing ports to move their stock are in support of the anti-smelter movement. And in response, I've heard the persons who oppose the establishment of smelters call for the drug runners to be identified among them.

Personally though, I don't think it matters who the drug runners are. If I were a drug runner, I wouldn't want major industrialisation taking place in or around any of my choice and quiet beach ports; I would be front and centre protesting too in between shipments. You just wouldn't know that I have an ulterior motive, like I assume many of the political and quasi-political movements do. But that's just an assumption, and an aside.

What I haven't heard much of is responses from the people who are supposed to set up these smelters.

Today, before heading out on the road to take Carnival Monday pictures, I ran across a section on Alcoa's website that the company has set up just to answer questions on their Trinidad and Tobago initiative.

It hadn't dawned on me until I read it that Alcoa already has a longstanding presence in Trinidad, as the following excerpt from their site explains.
Trinidad and Tobago brings together the operations of two Alcoa businesses: Alcoa World Alumina and the Alcoa Steamship Company. Alcoa has operated a materials transfer station at Tembladora in Trinidad and Tobago for more than sixty years, using the country's strategic location to ship bauxite and alumina to destinations in the U.S and Europe.

Tembladora offers deep-water harbor facilities, close to Alcoa's alumina operations in Suriname, which are located on a river too shallow for large ships. At the transfer station, shuttle ships from Suriname offload alumina for transfer to large vessels bound for customers in Baltimore, USA; Dunkirk, France; and Mosjoen, Norway.

Tembladora began service in 1950, although the Alcoa Marine Department was operating in the country since 1941. Bauxite shipment was discontinued in 1983, focusing operations on alumina. Today Tembladora employs 21 people and loads out an average of 525,000 tons of alumina per year. In June 2003, Tembladora received ISO 14001 Certification, making it one of only eight businesses in Trinidad and Tobago to achieve the environmental certification standard.

Alcoa is currently exploring the longer-term feasibility of building and operating a modern, low-emission aluminium smelter in Trinidad and Tobago based on energy derived from the country's vast natural gas resources.
The site further provides an overview of the proposed project that was to be situated at Chatham, the history of the environment and social impact assessment process with the EMA, a long list of noted stakeholders and
meetings with stakeholders going back to May 2004, information on Alcoa's global smelting operations, and a list of frequently asked questions about smelting, especially pertaining to the proposed operation in South Trinidad. They have even included an email address - AlcoaTrinidad@alcoa.com - at which you can contact them if you wish more information or want to be included on the list of stakeholders.

All in all, the site makes for interesting reading, and it is apparent that Alcoa is trying present a reasoned and reasonable case. They also seem to be seeking to ensure that if they come here, it is with the blessing of all potentially affected, and their operations benefit the country as well.

I'm still neither for nor against the smelters in South. But after reading what Alcoa had to say without anti-smelter activists shouting them down in public fora, I do consider myself a little better informed on the issues. I can thus make a decision based - if it were mine to make - on the issues and on information rather than on the rhetoric and politicising taking place on both sides.

Sunday, February 11, 2007

Prof. Selwyn Ryan on the Crime Problem...

I haven't disappeared. In fact, I've spent the last two weeks writing for a decidedly smaller audience. A group of Queen's Royal College alumni have been in lengthy discussion and debate on the state of the country, and in particular, the problem of crime. We are working though to transition our discussions into something more, and you may hear about that in the near future.

In the mean time, other writings on crime and criminality - not rhetoric and la couray mind you, but academic and reasoned writing - have been attracting my attention and interest. Professor Selwyn Ryan has a very interesting piece on the subject in the Sunday Express of February 11th, 2007. Under the caption, "The Jamaicanisation of Trinidad [LINK]," Professor Ryan notes similarities in social changes in Jamaica, Trinidad and Guyana, and looks at the respective Government's actions in attempting to address growing crime problems.

Jumping out at me in his article though is support of something that I have been saying for some time - that the crime problem did not simply rear its head overnight, but took generations to develop, and thus requires careful planning and time to unravel and address. Professor Ryan writes:
The Jamaican and Guyanese experiences make it pellucidly clear that there are no quick fixes for the crime problem, and certainly none that can be achieved by relying on states of emergency, extra-judicial executions or highly paid consultants whose experience is grounded in other legal and bureaucratic cultures. As one master don is eliminated, a battle ensues for the succession, in effect decentralising control of the crime syndicates.
The crime problem is the result of many things that we did collectively as a society over the years and about which some said that "we like it so". Some of the problems were the by-product of things that we inherited by reason of the fact that we live in a particular geographical space. Others were the result of the opportunistic behaviour of our business and professional elites.
As Attorney General John Jeremie recently pointed out, the collapse of the criminal justice system did not occur overnight. Collapse was due in part to the activities of attorneys who once upon a time conspired to attack the heart of the system by making files and witnesses "disappear" mysteriously; it was also due to the activities of clever senior lawyers who, for the benefit of their own pockets, ensured a multitude of court appearances and the inapplicability of paper committals; it was due as well to the activities of opposition MPs who have a vested interest in failure and call for change and performance but ensure it does not happen lest it support the efforts of the Government in power.
The entire article makes for very interesting reading, and one hopes that coming from an academic of Professor Ryan's standing, it receives the thought and recognition that it deserves, and is not brushed off as pro-PNM grandiloquence.

Follow @Keith_in_TnT
on Twitter | via RSS Feed